Women Reading

unephotonoire:

Original vintage press photo showing two students studying while incarcerated at the Baltimore City jail in 1964. The students had been protesting segregation at a local theater and were arrested.

books0977:

Girl on a Chair. Leonid Balaklav (Israeli, 1956). Oil on canvas.

"…But it seems that only now, once the ‘fence’ has been dismantled, the artist has the ability to confirm the world as achieving a balance between synthesis of inner and external worlds, that radiates physical and spiritual light, while projecting a feeling of goodness and blessing" — Gideon Ofrat, Behind the Fence, 2010

books0977:

The Fairy Tale (c.1845/1870). James Sant (British, 1820-1926). Oil on canvas. Walker Art Gallery.

Like this enraptured small boy with his playthings and study cast aside, the Victorians revelled in a story which fired the imagination. Here, following the boy’s transfixed gaze and his mother’s uplifted arm, they would have been elevated into the realms of fantasy.

lilacsinthedooryard:

Quiet Read  by a contemporary artist, chinoiserie painter, Mark Briscoe, born in 1964, from England.

(via windypoplarsroom)

books0977:

Two Women at the Table. August Macke (German, 1887-1914). Oil on canvas.

Macke’s world of paintings is unmistakable. Quiet compositions, scenes of nature, the open countryside or of places inhabited by monumental, faceless figures show his harmony-seeking look at the contemplative world of the regular citizen - until the outbreak of World War I.

books0977:

The Orchard Window (1918). Daniel Garber (American, 1880-1958). Oil on canvas. Philadelphia Museum of Art.

Garber’s daughter Tanis is seated in front of a light-filled window that looks out to a vibrant flower garden. The scene takes place in the small stone cottage along the Cuttalossa Creek in Lumberville, Pennsylvania, that Garber acquired in 1915 with the intention of creating a rustic homestead that reflected his artistic vision.

books0977:

An Afternoon Read. Louis Charles Verwee (Belgian, 1832-1882). Oil on canvas.

Verwee learned to paint with his father, who was a well-known landscape and animal painter of the Romantic school. Verwee painted portrait and genre scenes, people doing everyday things, like reading, in interiors, greenhouses, gazebos and gardens.

Kim Novak (1968)